Drake - Bad Choice-Good Choice - Linux vs Windows macOS ChromeOS

Linux Doesn’t Suck – Here’s Why Even Normies Should Use It

Intro

Linux has long been viewed as a science fair project for nerds. We explain why Linux doesn’t suck and why it’s now usable even for normies.

Some of the items discussed:

  1. Issues with Microsoft Windows
  2. Ease of use (file manager, network configuration, etc.)
  3. Performance (efficient use of resources)
  4. Hardware support
  5. Application support
  6. OS licensing
  7. Concerns about Windows, macOS, and ChromeOS evolving into Orwellian adware.

These other operating systems have their place, but we believe Linux should be used for personal and sensitive computing.

Podcast

1
00:00:00,000 –> 00:00:14,120
Hey, everybody, welcome back to the Bigger Insights Technology podcast, where we’ll help

2
00:00:14,120 –> 00:00:16,120
you stay ahead of the curve.

3
00:00:16,120 –> 00:00:21,120
In this episode, we’re going to explain why we think that Linux doesn’t suck,

4
00:00:21,120 –> 00:00:25,960
tt’s pretty great, actually, and why even normies should be using it.

5
00:00:25,960 –> 00:00:27,440
Don’t adjust your volume.

6
00:00:27,440 –> 00:00:29,120
You heard that right.

7
00:00:29,120 –> 00:00:34,880
Linux is no longer just a science fair project for nerds. But right off the bat, let me clear

8
00:00:34,880 –> 00:00:36,160
some things up.

9
00:00:36,160 –> 00:00:40,880
First, if you’re not familiar with our work, we also produce the Bigger Insights Privacy &

10
00:00:40,880 –> 00:00:44,600
Security podcast, so check that out if you’re interested.

11
00:00:44,600 –> 00:00:49,600
But I bring that up because there are many, many privacy and security reasons why you

12
00:00:49,600 –> 00:00:55,040
should consider using Linux, but we’re going to focus almost exclusively on the technical

13
00:00:55,040 –> 00:00:59,240
and usability aspects of Linux in this episode.

14
00:00:59,240 –> 00:01:04,680
We might also produce separate privacy and security episodes regarding Linux, if we feel

15
00:01:04,680 –> 00:01:05,680
like it.

16
00:01:05,680 –> 00:01:10,760
The second thing that I want to make very clear is that although I have been using Linux

17
00:01:10,760 –> 00:01:16,480
as a daily driver for years now, I wouldn’t necessarily consider myself an expert, although

18
00:01:16,480 –> 00:01:18,360
I do have pretty high standards,

19
00:01:18,360 –> 00:01:23,720
so some may disagree with that, but I still have a lot to learn about it.

20
00:01:23,720 –> 00:01:28,160
And keep in mind that I’ve been using Windows since the 90s.

21
00:01:28,160 –> 00:01:33,960
So much of this episode is going to talk about Linux relative to Windows, but some of this

22
00:01:33,960 –> 00:01:36,800
also applies to macOS as well.

23
00:01:36,800 –> 00:01:43,160
I was in denial about how bad Windows* was literally for decades, mostly because I knew

24
00:01:43,160 –> 00:01:48,000
that macOS had some of the same problems as well, and it didn’t seem like Linux was

25
00:01:48,000 –> 00:01:50,400
usable as a daily driver.

26
00:01:50,400 –> 00:01:52,920
Well, things have changed.

27
00:01:52,920 –> 00:01:57,840
Believe it or not, and keep in mind this is coming from a longtime Windows user, not one

28
00:01:57,840 –> 00:02:03,520
of those hardcore Linux people who say it’s better than everything else in every way.

29
00:02:03,520 –> 00:02:07,800
Linux has come a long way and is actually quite amazing.

30
00:02:07,800 –> 00:02:09,400
So what happened?

31
00:02:09,400 –> 00:02:11,360
How did I come to this conclusion?

32
00:02:11,360 –> 00:02:16,960
Well, I’ve been dabbling with Linux here and there for, I don’t know, maybe 12 years

33
00:02:16,960 –> 00:02:20,200
or so, but never took it very seriously.

34
00:02:20,200 –> 00:02:26,000
For me, it had always been like a little nerdy side project just to see what it’s about,

35
00:02:26,000 –> 00:02:30,280
but I never saw it as a potential replacement for Windows.

36
00:02:30,280 –> 00:02:35,360
Over time, I started educating myself on privacy and security matters.

37
00:02:35,360 –> 00:02:39,080
And one of those concerns was Windows itself.

38
00:02:39,080 –> 00:02:41,320
How can I make it more secure?

39
00:02:41,320 –> 00:02:43,160
What data is it collecting?

40
00:02:43,160 –> 00:02:47,240
What can I disable to minimize telemetry? And so on.

41
00:02:47,240 –> 00:02:53,000
I ended up developing a procedure that I would use when setting up new Windows systems.

42
00:02:53,000 –> 00:03:00,880
Disable Cortana, inking and typing, any setting with “experience” in the name, auto-run, discoverability,

43
00:03:00,880 –> 00:03:08,200
remote desktop, anything related to location or maps. And obviously uninstall all the garbage

44
00:03:08,200 –> 00:03:13,320
default apps it installs, which for some reason they won’t let you uninstall some of them

45
00:03:13,320 –> 00:03:19,000
like Xbox Game Bar or whatever it’s called. I don’t even own an Xbox.

46
00:03:19,000 –> 00:03:22,800
Why do I need an Xbox app on my PC?

47
00:03:22,800 –> 00:03:28,480
But anyway, this ended up becoming like three pages long, and it was very tedious and time-consuming

48
00:03:28,480 –> 00:03:30,120
to carry out.

49
00:03:30,120 –> 00:03:35,600
Then I started reading about O&O Shut Up 10, and related tools for disabling Windows

50
00:03:35,600 –> 00:03:43,000
functionality through registry edits because Microsoft hides a lot of settings in the registry

51
00:03:43,000 –> 00:03:45,280
so normies can’t find them.

52
00:03:45,280 –> 00:03:50,680
Then one day I was going through the Group Policy Editor to try to disable some features.

53
00:03:50,680 –> 00:03:55,040
I started poking around some of these things and reading their descriptions.

54
00:03:55,040 –> 00:03:57,240
What I saw was pretty disturbing.

55
00:03:57,240 –> 00:04:03,200
Some of these things in the group policy editor described screenshots, mouse clicks, keystrokes,

56
00:04:03,200 –> 00:04:06,080
and files being sent back to Microsoft.

57
00:04:06,080 –> 00:04:10,640
And I don’t know about you guys, but that just doesn’t sound very appealing to me.

58
00:04:10,640 –> 00:04:15,480
And one can assume that if they’re willing to admit stuff like that to the user, there’s

59
00:04:15,480 –> 00:04:20,040
a fair chance that there are even scarier things that are lurking beneath the surface

60
00:04:20,040 –> 00:04:22,480
that they’re not willing to admit to.

61
00:04:22,480 –> 00:04:27,880
So around this time, I was kind of ignoring the 800 pound penguin in the room, which was

62
00:04:27,880 –> 00:04:28,880
Linux.

63
00:04:28,880 –> 00:04:32,120
The issue here was that I’ve been using Windows since forever.

64
00:04:32,120 –> 00:04:37,920
A lot of my documents and templates were in Office files and so on, and I really didn’t

65
00:04:37,920 –> 00:04:43,440
want to spend the time to learn a new operating system, especially one that I kind of assumed

66
00:04:43,440 –> 00:04:46,880
would be inferior and difficult to use.

67
00:04:46,880 –> 00:04:52,160
After setting up some new Windows installations, watching it do things like jack up partitions

68
00:04:52,160 –> 00:04:57,680
and not be able to fix them, overwrite LUKS headers on my Linux drives, and see some of

69
00:04:57,680 –> 00:05:02,680
the creepy things that it does, I finally caved and decided it was time to throw in

70
00:05:02,680 –> 00:05:04,640
the towel on Windows.

71
00:05:04,640 –> 00:05:06,440
There’s just no fixing it.

72
00:05:06,440 –> 00:05:11,600
There’s no configuring it to the point where you can actually trust and understand what

73
00:05:11,600 –> 00:05:12,600
it’s really doing.

74
00:05:12,600 –> 00:05:19,160
And if that wasn’t enough, I’m seeing more and more news stories and hints that Microsoft

75
00:05:19,160 –> 00:05:22,920
is basically turning Windows into adware.

76
00:05:22,920 –> 00:05:25,960
Imagine if Fecesbook made an operating system.

77
00:05:25,960 –> 00:05:31,120
This is the direction that it looks like Windows is heading toward and we want nothing to do

78
00:05:31,120 –> 00:05:32,120
with that.

79
00:05:32,120 –> 00:05:35,000
And don’t even get me started on macOS.

80
00:05:35,000 –> 00:05:39,920
Like Windows, it’s closed-source, but it has concerns all on its own, which we may discuss

81
00:05:39,920 –> 00:05:41,560
in a future episode.

82
00:05:41,560 –> 00:05:43,800
So that’s a dead end as well.

83
00:05:43,800 –> 00:05:48,960
Ultimately I decided to bite the bullet and give Linux a serious try as a daily driver.

84
00:05:48,960 –> 00:05:53,240
The first thing that I tried was Qubes OS, which we definitely don’t recommend for new

85
00:05:53,240 –> 00:05:56,800
Linux users, especially if it’s your only machine.

86
00:05:56,800 –> 00:06:02,000
We’ll probably make some episodes on Qubes OS in the future, so let us know if you’re

87
00:06:02,000 –> 00:06:03,000
interested.

88
00:06:03,000 –> 00:06:04,400
Qubes OS was great.

89
00:06:04,400 –> 00:06:08,840
We think it’s actually easier to use than most people give it credit for and should

90
00:06:08,840 –> 00:06:13,480
be considered for some normies as long as they have some help.

91
00:06:13,480 –> 00:06:19,000
But we ended up switching to Fedora for a while for hardware and performance reasons, and

92
00:06:19,000 –> 00:06:22,680
it’s always nice to try out a new Linux* operating system.

93
00:06:22,680 –> 00:06:28,360
Now that we’ve been using Fedora for a while, honestly, we’re pretty blown away by it.

94
00:06:28,360 –> 00:06:30,400
All of our hardware works with it.

95
00:06:30,400 –> 00:06:36,160
We’ve got a dock, audio interface, multiple monitors, cameras and whatnot, and it all

96
00:06:36,160 –> 00:06:38,400
works flawlessly.

97
00:06:38,400 –> 00:06:43,160
When I first started setting up my machine, I was surprised to not only see how well the

98
00:06:43,160 –> 00:06:49,040
hardware works, but how much easier it is to set some things up compared to Windows.

99
00:06:49,040 –> 00:06:51,840
Take network configuration, for example.

100
00:06:51,840 –> 00:06:55,840
Other than maybe some PowerShell commands or something like that, if you want to change

101
00:06:55,840 –> 00:07:01,280
your DNS settings in Windows, you need to go through like six dialogs, some of which

102
00:07:01,280 –> 00:07:04,920
haven’t been changed in decades as far as I can tell.

103
00:07:04,920 –> 00:07:10,080
I literally wrote down these convoluted steps in these Windows notes that I have because

104
00:07:10,080 –> 00:07:14,720
I always forget and it takes me like 10 minutes to figure it out.

105
00:07:14,720 –> 00:07:16,120
How about in Linux?

106
00:07:16,120 –> 00:07:20,080
You click on your network, open the settings dialog, and boom!

107
00:07:20,080 –> 00:07:26,400
Right there you’ve got your IPv4 and IPv6 tabs where you can set your DNS and other settings.

108
00:07:26,400 –> 00:07:28,080
It takes 20 seconds.

109
00:07:28,080 –> 00:07:32,720
I also noticed that my printers worked without having to do anything.

110
00:07:32,720 –> 00:07:34,720
Contrast that with Windows.

111
00:07:34,720 –> 00:07:38,080
Right now I have three Windows 10 installations.

112
00:07:38,080 –> 00:07:41,240
Two of them recognize both of my printers.

113
00:07:41,240 –> 00:07:45,160
One of them recognizes one printer, but not the other.

114
00:07:45,160 –> 00:07:46,160
Doesn’t even see it.

115
00:07:46,160 –> 00:07:48,520
I have absolutely no idea why.

116
00:07:48,520 –> 00:07:52,600
I spent so much time trying to figure it out that I just gave up.

117
00:07:52,600 –> 00:07:56,280
Linux is also great at working with file systems.

118
00:07:56,280 –> 00:08:01,920
All of the Linux distributions I’ve worked with seem to have no problem with NTFS, which

119
00:08:01,920 –> 00:08:03,720
is a Windows format.

120
00:08:03,720 –> 00:08:09,040
But it can also handle a lot of other formats and even fix Windows mistakes.

121
00:08:09,040 –> 00:08:10,360
This is not a joke.

122
00:08:10,360 –> 00:08:15,400
There have been at least two instances in my life where Windows has screwed up a partition

123
00:08:15,400 –> 00:08:21,400
so badly that the only way I was able to fix it was boot up Linux and reformat it with

124
00:08:21,400 –> 00:08:22,400
GParted.

125
00:08:22,400 –> 00:08:24,840
I mean, just think about that for a second.

126
00:08:24,840 –> 00:08:28,720
I had to use Linux, a free operating system,

127
00:08:28,720 –> 00:08:31,960
yes, I know it’s really just a kernel, but you know what I mean.

128
00:08:31,960 –> 00:08:35,840
to fix partitions that Windows screwed up.

129
00:08:35,840 –> 00:08:42,080
And I used this to create NTFS partitions, which again is made by Microsoft.

130
00:08:42,080 –> 00:08:47,080
If I was Microsoft, I would be so ashamed of that that I would rethink my life.

131
00:08:47,080 –> 00:08:52,560
Oh, I almost forgot about this, but I’ve also used Linux to help people recover data from

132
00:08:52,560 –> 00:08:58,520
NAS systems and whatnot because most non-Windows computers around the world run Linux and don’t

133
00:08:58,520 –> 00:09:00,840
use NTFS for that reason.

134
00:09:00,840 –> 00:09:03,800
Alright, some more along the normie lines.

135
00:09:03,800 –> 00:09:07,960
What about basic things like a file manager or explorer?

136
00:09:07,960 –> 00:09:14,400
Believe it or not, at least in Fedora, we like the file manager better than Windows Explorer.

137
00:09:14,400 –> 00:09:20,960
It’s simpler, more intuitive, has tabs, which I think Windows finally added not that long

138
00:09:20,960 –> 00:09:24,920
ago and the best part, it doesn’t crash on you!

139
00:09:24,920 –> 00:09:28,440
This is one of the most embarrassing things about Windows.

140
00:09:28,440 –> 00:09:33,560
Windows Explorer was pretty stable until around the time that Windows 10 came out, in which

141
00:09:33,560 –> 00:09:39,560
case Windows 7 actually started having this issue where Explorer would just crash on you

142
00:09:39,560 –> 00:09:43,000
out of the blue. And this affected Windows 10 as well.

143
00:09:43,000 –> 00:09:46,080
So that’s been like how many years now?

144
00:09:46,080 –> 00:09:47,280
Around 10?

145
00:09:47,280 –> 00:09:51,640
And still sometimes when I get on Windows, Explorer crashes on me.

146
00:09:51,640 –> 00:09:56,480
That might not sound like a big deal, but when you’ve got 20 important Windows open and

147
00:09:56,480 –> 00:10:01,560
are transferring files around and Explorer crashes on you, you’ll find out real quick

148
00:10:01,560 –> 00:10:03,800
how much of a pain that really is.

149
00:10:03,800 –> 00:10:09,320
Oh, and I almost forgot, Nautilus, which is the name of this Linux file manager I’m talking

150
00:10:09,320 –> 00:10:15,200
about, has this Rename feature where you can quickly rename one or more files by replacing

151
00:10:15,200 –> 00:10:17,000
whatever text you want.

152
00:10:17,000 –> 00:10:21,960
I use that thing all the time and I remember I used to work in a place where we installed

153
00:10:21,960 –> 00:10:26,440
this sketchy Explorer add-on just for this purpose.

154
00:10:26,440 –> 00:10:33,240
You can also right click on a file or directory and compress it to zip, tar.xz, or seven zip.

155
00:10:33,240 –> 00:10:35,800
Now let’s talk about performance.

156
00:10:35,800 –> 00:10:40,000
Linux is generally lighter on resources than Windows is.

157
00:10:40,000 –> 00:10:47,120
When I was using Qubes OS, the Debian and Fedora Qubes used something like 200 to 300 megabytes

158
00:10:47,120 –> 00:10:49,240
of RAM at baseline.

159
00:10:49,240 –> 00:10:50,680
That’s pretty good.

160
00:10:50,680 –> 00:10:53,600
It’s also light on CPU usage.

161
00:10:53,600 –> 00:10:58,760
I do have a decent processor, but when I look at my CPU usage, it’s usually in the 3%

162
00:10:58,760 –> 00:11:00,640
to 5% range.

163
00:11:00,640 –> 00:11:06,120
My CPU usage is so low that my fan usually doesn’t even run.

164
00:11:06,120 –> 00:11:11,320
In fact, when I first got this laptop, I was starting to think that the CPU fan was broken

165
00:11:11,320 –> 00:11:13,440
because it just wasn’t running.

166
00:11:13,440 –> 00:11:21,280
Speaking of which, I had this problem, I think it was in 2020 or 2021, where Windows 10 had

167
00:11:21,280 –> 00:11:27,920
this process that ran at a steady 30% CPU usage for months.

168
00:11:27,920 –> 00:11:34,440
I think it was something called ntoscore or ntoskernel or something like that.

169
00:11:34,440 –> 00:11:37,440
It drove me absolutely up the wall.

170
00:11:37,440 –> 00:11:40,880
They eventually fixed it, but then the problem came back.

171
00:11:40,880 –> 00:11:43,280
Then they fixed it again, and then it came back.

172
00:11:43,280 –> 00:11:45,880
This went back and forth for like a year.

173
00:11:45,880 –> 00:11:50,040
I just don’t see problems like these in Linux.

174
00:11:50,040 –> 00:11:53,320
Linux also doesn’t require as much disk space.

175
00:11:53,320 –> 00:11:57,880
One time I worked at a place where we would partition people’s hard drives to separate

176
00:11:57,880 –> 00:12:00,520
the operating system from their data.

177
00:12:00,520 –> 00:12:04,000
I’m not sure that’s a great idea, but that’s just what they did.

178
00:12:04,000 –> 00:12:09,040
But over time, we started running into issues where Windows kept growing in size to the

179
00:12:09,040 –> 00:12:14,560
point where we would need to re-partition the user’s hard drive to give Windows more space,

180
00:12:14,560 –> 00:12:17,280
which is not as easy as you would think.

181
00:12:17,280 –> 00:12:22,600
Linux is generally smaller and it does grow somewhat over time, but at a more manageable

182
00:12:22,600 –> 00:12:23,600
pace.

183
00:12:23,600 –> 00:12:28,440
So the point here is that Linux allows you to do more with less, which could mean doing

184
00:12:28,440 –> 00:12:33,760
the same work on a cheaper system or much more work on the same system.

185
00:12:33,760 –> 00:12:39,880
You don’t need a $2,000 MacBook to check your email, pay your bills, and post selfies

186
00:12:39,880 –> 00:12:40,880
on Instasham.

187
00:12:40,880 –> 00:12:47,120
You could literally do all of that on a $50 Raspberry Pi. But Apple and Microsoft don’t

188
00:12:47,120 –> 00:12:48,760
want you to know that.

189
00:12:48,760 –> 00:12:54,160
One of the things that they do is consistently update the operating system to do more work,

190
00:12:54,160 –> 00:12:59,920
whether that be more telemetry or some kind of AI BS that you don’t really need.

191
00:12:59,920 –> 00:13:05,960
But what that does is it makes PCs become obsolete sooner than they otherwise would.

192
00:13:05,960 –> 00:13:10,840
If you’re doing basic computing on Linux, you can easily use a computer for more than

193
00:13:10,840 –> 00:13:11,840
10 years.

194
00:13:11,840 –> 00:13:19,520
In fact, I have a PC right now that I built in 2012, which I only spent like $2,200 on it

195
00:13:19,520 –> 00:13:20,520
at the time.

196
00:13:20,520 –> 00:13:26,240
So it was never really that beefy to begin with, yet it still runs great on Linux.

197
00:13:26,240 –> 00:13:30,240
And another thing worth mentioning is using virtual machines (VMs).

198
00:13:30,240 –> 00:13:34,080
We think everyone should be using virtual machines for various reasons.

199
00:13:34,080 –> 00:13:39,200
But if you’ve ever run Windows VMs, you understand how intensive that can be.

200
00:13:39,200 –> 00:13:43,360
You might only be able to run two or three of them before your system really starts to

201
00:13:43,360 –> 00:13:44,840
bog down.

202
00:13:44,840 –> 00:13:50,160
On my laptop, I sometimes have a dozen Linux VMs running and don’t even notice a performance

203
00:13:50,160 –> 00:13:51,160
impact.

204
00:13:51,160 –> 00:13:54,480
And on top of that, there’s the whole licensing issue.

205
00:13:54,480 –> 00:14:00,040
Do you really want to license a dozen Windows machines when you can use Linux for free,

206
00:14:00,040 –> 00:14:05,600
without permission, and be able to run more of them because they use fewer resources?

207
00:14:05,600 –> 00:14:07,360
Think about it sometime.

208
00:14:07,360 –> 00:14:09,680
Now let’s talk about the future.

209
00:14:09,680 –> 00:14:14,680
As I alluded to earlier, we’re seeing more and more evidence that Microsoft is turning

210
00:14:14,680 –> 00:14:16,760
Windows into adware.

211
00:14:16,760 –> 00:14:23,760
They even went so far as to test or explore placing ads directly in Windows Explorer.

212
00:14:23,760 –> 00:14:26,360
You can’t make this stuff up.

213
00:14:26,360 –> 00:14:32,480
Microsoft is expanding its ad business and in concert with Bing and their AI efforts,

214
00:14:32,480 –> 00:14:34,920
we have serious concerns about this.

215
00:14:34,920 –> 00:14:39,120
Did you know that Windows Explorer makes connections to bing.com?

216
00:14:39,120 –> 00:14:40,200
Why?

217
00:14:40,200 –> 00:14:44,160
What data is being transmitted and what is it being used for?

218
00:14:44,160 –> 00:14:45,320
We’re not sure.

219
00:14:45,320 –> 00:14:50,400
Only Microsoft knows that, but we have a sneaking suspicion that if you knew, you wouldn’t be

220
00:14:50,400 –> 00:14:52,040
happy with it.

221
00:14:52,040 –> 00:14:53,520
What about Apple?

222
00:14:53,520 –> 00:14:59,240
Well, we generally consider Apple to have a little more integrity than Microsoft, but

223
00:14:59,240 –> 00:15:04,320
that’s difficult to quantify and it may just be the case that they’re either just better

224
00:15:04,320 –> 00:15:09,880
at PR or at hiding their practices and intentions from their users.

225
00:15:09,880 –> 00:15:15,560
But what we do know is Apple is pushing into the advertising space as well.

226
00:15:15,560 –> 00:15:22,120
Apple has been subject of multiple class-action lawsuits regarding deceptive privacy practices

227
00:15:22,120 –> 00:15:26,120
like collecting users information despite opt-outs.

228
00:15:26,120 –> 00:15:32,680
Now why would Apple, the supposed champion of privacy, violate people’s privacy like

229
00:15:32,680 –> 00:15:33,680
that?

230
00:15:33,680 –> 00:15:39,840
Of course, only they know for sure, but we suspect it’s for advertising purposes.

231
00:15:39,840 –> 00:15:42,080
Why else would they do that?

232
00:15:42,080 –> 00:15:47,480
Not to mention the whole client-side scanning (CSS) thing, which we suspect will resurface in

233
00:15:47,480 –> 00:15:50,520
some form at some point in the future.

234
00:15:50,520 –> 00:15:54,760
You know, once these Big Tech companies decide they want to do something and they receive

235
00:15:54,760 –> 00:16:00,160
backlash, they tend to back off for a little bit, then bring it back up with some different

236
00:16:00,160 –> 00:16:01,840
spin on it.

237
00:16:01,840 –> 00:16:06,680
Let’s look at what Google did with FLOC: Federated Learning of Cohorts.

238
00:16:06,680 –> 00:16:10,800
They backed off on that because they received a lot of negative feedback.

239
00:16:10,800 –> 00:16:12,400
So is it dead?

240
00:16:12,400 –> 00:16:17,920
Nope, they just rolled it out under a new name called Privacy Sandbox because they’re

241
00:16:17,920 –> 00:16:20,440
just looking out for your privacy.

242
00:16:20,440 –> 00:16:26,880
Microsoft has also been contemplating a cloud version of Windows, which sounds like a disaster

243
00:16:26,880 –> 00:16:28,320
waiting to happen.

244
00:16:28,320 –> 00:16:33,800
And it may not happen, but we would bet a lot of money that Microsoft would make Windows

245
00:16:33,800 –> 00:16:37,880
cloud-only if they thought they could get away with it.

246
00:16:37,880 –> 00:16:43,840
The point is that we see where Windows, macOS, and ChromeOS are heading, and it looks

247
00:16:43,840 –> 00:16:46,200
like a 1984 hellscape.

248
00:16:46,200 –> 00:16:50,640
So we’re of the opinion that the sooner you switch to something that better respects

249
00:16:50,640 –> 00:16:54,320
you and your data, the better off you’ll be.

250
00:16:54,320 –> 00:16:57,040
Now let’s talk about applications.

251
00:16:57,040 –> 00:17:02,840
In the past, it was the case that many applications didn’t have a Linux version.

252
00:17:02,840 –> 00:17:07,920
For certain types of software, that still is the case, but Linux has come a long way

253
00:17:07,920 –> 00:17:09,640
in this regard.

254
00:17:09,640 –> 00:17:14,480
Every major browser or VPN worth its salt has a Linux client.

255
00:17:14,480 –> 00:17:20,000
You can run Steam, Spotify, and many other normie apps on Linux.

256
00:17:20,000 –> 00:17:24,680
Another thing that’s helping to relieve this issue is the increasing prevalence of web

257
00:17:24,680 –> 00:17:26,960
apps and progressive web apps (PWAs).

258
00:17:26,960 –> 00:17:32,400
So if some service that you use doesn’t support Linux, they may have a web app you can use,

259
00:17:32,400 –> 00:17:38,080
which may also be more private and secure than running their native apps anyway.

260
00:17:38,080 –> 00:17:41,480
But again, there are some apps that don’t support Linux.

261
00:17:41,480 –> 00:17:44,480
I believe most Adobe apps do not.

262
00:17:44,480 –> 00:17:47,600
But again, this episode is for normies.

263
00:17:47,600 –> 00:17:50,680
What do you really use Adobe apps for?

264
00:17:50,680 –> 00:17:53,440
Photoshop to make a few memes?

265
00:17:53,440 –> 00:17:56,040
Maybe a little art in Illustrator?

266
00:17:56,040 –> 00:17:59,000
Maybe read or fill out some PDFs in Acrobat?

267
00:17:59,000 –> 00:18:01,160
Well, I’ve got good news for you.

268
00:18:01,160 –> 00:18:04,960
You can do all of that on Linux without Adobe.

269
00:18:04,960 –> 00:18:07,520
For Photoshop, you can use GIMP (GNU Imange Manipulation Program).

270
00:18:07,520 –> 00:18:09,240
We use it all the time.

271
00:18:09,240 –> 00:18:15,240
For Illustrator, there’s Inkscape, which we use for logos and some of our dank memes.

272
00:18:15,240 –> 00:18:21,000
For PDFs, there’s an app called Evince, also known as GNOME Document Viewer, which comes

273
00:18:21,000 –> 00:18:23,480
with many Linux distributions.

274
00:18:23,480 –> 00:18:25,560
What about Microsoft Office?

275
00:18:25,560 –> 00:18:27,480
We use LibreOffice.

276
00:18:27,480 –> 00:18:33,360
Not only is it free, which I don’t know about you, but we like having money in our pocket

277
00:18:33,360 –> 00:18:39,320
rather than in Microsoft’s, but it’s cross-platform, doesn’t spy on you, and it generally works

278
00:18:39,320 –> 00:18:41,760
with Office file formats.

279
00:18:41,760 –> 00:18:43,960
It’s actually quite amazing.

280
00:18:43,960 –> 00:18:49,040
Even if you’re on Windows or macOS, we still think that you should try to make LibreOffice

281
00:18:49,040 –> 00:18:50,040
work for you.

282
00:18:50,040 –> 00:18:54,440
But we’re not going to sit here and try to make you think that there aren’t still issues

283
00:18:54,440 –> 00:18:55,440
here.

284
00:18:55,440 –> 00:18:59,480
If you’re a hardcore gamer or something like that, it will probably make sense for you

285
00:18:59,480 –> 00:19:01,520
to have a Windows machine.

286
00:19:01,520 –> 00:19:06,760
What we typically recommend that our clients do is have two machines: A Linux one and a

287
00:19:06,760 –> 00:19:08,200
Windows one.

288
00:19:08,200 –> 00:19:12,920
If you like to live dangerously, you could dual-boot on one machine, but we’ve had some

289
00:19:12,920 –> 00:19:19,240
pretty bad experiences with Windows screwing that up, so separate machines are preferred.

290
00:19:19,240 –> 00:19:24,560
So what you would do is your personal and more sensitive computing on your Linux machine,

291
00:19:24,560 –> 00:19:30,040
then gaming and other niche activities on Windows. But other than that, and excluding

292
00:19:30,040 –> 00:19:35,720
certain professional requirements, of course, we’re quite convinced that many, many people

293
00:19:35,720 –> 00:19:41,360
out there could do everything they actually need to do on a cheap Linux system.

294
00:19:41,360 –> 00:19:47,040
So not only are they throwing money away on Windows and macOS devices, but there are very

295
00:19:47,040 –> 00:19:51,160
serious privacy and security concerns there as well.

296
00:19:51,160 –> 00:19:58,520
So take grandma, for example. What does she use her computer for? Calls? Use Signal or Jitsi.

297
00:19:58,520 –> 00:20:06,400
Shopping or checking the weather? Use Firefox, Tor, Brave, LibreWolf, Mullvad Browser or one

298
00:20:06,400 –> 00:20:12,280
of the many other good browsers on Linux. Read statements and bills? GNOME Document

299
00:20:12,280 –> 00:20:17,800
Viewer. Write some letters to little Johnny and little Susie? LibreOffice. You see what

300
00:20:17,800 –> 00:20:21,760
I mean? So let’s just do a quick recap.

301
00:20:21,760 –> 00:20:27,600
Linux is free, open-source, has pretty decent application support, doesn’t monetize your

302
00:20:27,600 –> 00:20:34,520
data, doesn’t show you ads, is light on resources, and in many ways is legitimately better than

303
00:20:34,520 –> 00:20:38,840
Windows and macOS, in our opinion. I’m not exaggerating.

304
00:20:38,840 –> 00:20:44,560
If I was an alien, which I can neither confirm nor deny, and I visited Earth and was given

305
00:20:44,560 –> 00:20:52,360
four PCs: Linux, Windows, macOS and ChromeOS. I am quite confident that I would eventually

306
00:20:52,360 –> 00:20:58,280
gravitate toward Linux, even without knowing that it’s free, and that the others are built

307
00:20:58,280 –> 00:21:04,960
and maintained by trillion-dollar companies. I would try all four – test performance, read

308
00:21:04,960 –> 00:21:11,840
the terms and conditions, inspect what limitations each imposes, as well as what data is being

309
00:21:11,840 –> 00:21:17,160
collected from each system, and conclude that Linux is the way to go.

310
00:21:17,160 –> 00:21:23,240
So hopefully by now we’ve convinced you that Linux is at least worth trying out.

311
00:21:23,240 –> 00:21:28,320
That’s all we’re trying to do in this episode. We’re not trying to tell you to go Office

312
00:21:28,320 –> 00:21:34,160
Space on your PCs or burn your MacBooks with fire, just that you should really start thinking

313
00:21:34,160 –> 00:21:35,960
about trying Linux.

314
00:21:35,960 –> 00:21:40,680
If people would do that, and get the hang of it, we’re quite confident that they would

315
00:21:40,680 –> 00:21:45,280
understand where we’re coming from on this, and agree with our conclusion.

316
00:21:45,280 –> 00:21:50,080
But before you go, note that we are working on another episode where we’re going to go

317
00:21:50,080 –> 00:21:55,600
into more detail about how to get started with Linux, so stay tuned for that.

318
00:21:55,600 –> 00:22:01,400
Otherwise, if you’d like more help getting started, we do help clients like you, with

319
00:22:01,400 –> 00:22:06,280
Linux and other technologies in one-on-one consulting sessions.

320
00:22:06,280 –> 00:22:10,920
If that sounds interesting to you, go to our website, biggerinsights.com, and fill out

321
00:22:10,920 –> 00:22:15,440
the short form at the bottom of the page so we can schedule your initial consultation.

322
00:22:15,440 –> 00:22:20,320
If you’ve found this content helpful, and can spare some coin, please consider making

323
00:22:20,320 –> 00:22:21,820
a contribution.

324
00:22:21,820 –> 00:22:27,200
We accept Monero, Bitcoin, and Litecoin, and we’ll put the address information in the

325
00:22:27,200 –> 00:22:28,440
description.

326
00:22:28,440 –> 00:22:33,160
We are once again asking you to subscribe and share this podcast, so we can help as

327
00:22:33,160 –> 00:22:35,320
many people as we can.

328
00:22:35,320 –> 00:22:40,600
If you haven’t guessed it by our content, Big Tech companies really aren’t fans of

329
00:22:40,600 –> 00:22:43,920
our work, so they’re less inclined to promote it.

330
00:22:43,920 –> 00:22:48,560
So we really need you to share our content so others can find it.

331
00:22:48,560 –> 00:22:50,880
All right, that’s it for this episode.

332
00:22:50,880 –> 00:22:52,560
Thanks for staying until the end.

333
00:22:52,560 –> 00:23:09,600
We hope that you’ll consider trying Linux someday, and have a great rest of your day.

Support Us

We’re an ethical company that puts our community first. You won’t find us injecting targeted ads or trackers into our website, peddling sketchy products/services, or selling our visitors’ data to 3rd-parties. As a result, our visibility and resources are rather limited.

Please consider supporting us to help keep our mission going. There are several ways to make a difference – from cryptocurrency contributions to simply sharing our content. Every bit of support is greatly appreciated and helps us make the world a more private, secure, and prosperous place.

More Great Content

  • All
  • Finance
  • Privacy & Security
  • Technology
Finance - Budgeting - Financial Planning - Accounting - Asset Allocation - Taxable and Tax-favored Accounts - Cash Finance

Asset Location: Taxable vs. Tax-favored Accounts (401k, IRA, HSA)

Asset Location (AKA Asset Placement) is a strategy for organizing your assets in an optimal way that helps you meet your financial goals. In the previous episode, we focused on asset location strategies for reducing taxes and simplifying your tax return. In this episode, we focus on asset location considerations ...
Continue →
Security - Software - Email - Computer Screen Privacy & Security

Email is Insecure – Here’s How to Improve Email Security

Email was never designed to be private or secure, so not surprisingly, it is neither private, nor secure. In the previous episode, we explained the reasons why as well as the risks inherent to email. However, email is so prevalent that it is unfortunately a necessary evil. In this episode, ...
Continue →
Planning - Concepting - Whiteboard - Tax Planning Tips - Asset Location - Asset Placement Finance

Asset Location: Reducing Taxes & Simplifying Your Tax Return

Asset Location (AKA Asset Placement) is a strategy for organizing your assets in such a way as to reduce tax burden, simplify your tax return, and manage risk. We discuss our Asset Location strategies, which includes specifics about tax treatment for growth stocks, dividend stocks, taxable bonds, real estate investment ...
Continue →
Email - Mobile Phone - Privacy and Security - Technology - Hands Privacy & Security

Email is Insecure – Stop Using it for Sensitive Communications

Email is the primary means of sending messages and documents for many people. Unfortunately, email was never designed to be private or secure. Over time, we’ve developed several tools and techniques to help make it more secure. But at the end of the day, no matter how uncomfortable it makes ...
Continue →
Woman Shopping - Holding Shopping Bags - Retail - Spending Money Finance

What Does it Mean to be Able to Afford Something?

Most everyone will agree that you shouldn’t buy things that you can’t afford, yet so many do. Why is that? It seems to us that one of the reasons for this is because many don’t know what it means to be able to afford something. Spoiler alert – it doesn’t ...
Continue →
Cybersecurity - Privacy and Security - Virtual Private Network (VPN) Privacy & Security

Are Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) Useless Honeypot Scams?

You may have heard others in the privacy and security community call virtual private networks (VPNs) “useless”, “scams”, or “honeypots”, but is this actually the case? There are certainly a lot of sketchy VPNs and creators who shill them, but does that invalidate the thesis for using a VPN? We ...
Continue →
Scroll to Top